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Japanese Style Painting

ROOTS

Reinterpretation

The Spinning Wheel of Karma

The Spinning Wheel of Karma

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Herbs, charcoal, chalk, gesso, ink, and acrylic on canvas
  • Dimensions: 14 x 18"
  • Solo MFA Thesis Exhibition: MU - Mutation Ecologies
  • Place: MFA Gallery, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2019
Tōhaku’s Pine Trees and Deformation

Tōhaku’s Pine Trees and Deformation

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Ink, gesso, and acrylic on canvas
  • Dimensions: 20 x 10" / 24 x 8"
  • Solo MFA Thesis Exhibition: MU - Mutation Ecologies
  • Place: MFA Gallery, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2019
Mutating Moment #6 and #7

Mutating Moment #6 and #7

  • Type: Drawing
  • Medium: Charcoal and ink on kraft paper
  • Dimensions: 24 x 24" / 36⅝ x 27½"
  • Group Exhibition: Spoor
  • Place: Pilotenkueche, Leipzig, Germany
  • Year: 2018
Mutating Moment #5

Mutating Moment #5

  • Type: Mixed Media Painting
  • Medium: Charcoal, ink, acrylic, clay, waste paper, and kraft paper on panel
  • Dimensions: 15¾ x 31½"
  • Group Exhibition: Spoor
  • Place: Pilotenkueche, Leipzig, Germany
  • Year: 2018

Through the idea of rehabilitation, these artworks came from reusing the material from a performance titled "The Day After" (which was itself reprocessing materials from a previous exhibition). I exhibited them by referring to the idea of the "spoor" which was the title of the exhibition. Through my previous performances, I learned to conceive the body as sculpture and architecture. I drew and painted moments of mutation on damaged papers to emphasize the traces left from previous uses.

Ōkyo’s Dogs

Ōkyo’s Dogs

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Oil on canvas on panel
  • Dimensions: 24 x 20"
  • Event: Open Studio
  • Place: Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2017
Japanese Bosch

Japanese Bosch

  • Type: Drawing
  • Medium: Ink on paper
  • Dimensions: 18 x 24"
  • Event: Open Studio
  • Place: Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2017
Vain Regrets

Vain Regrets

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 23⅞ x 17⅞"
  • Solo Exhibition: In the Interval of Memories
  • Event: HANARART
  • Place: Registered Tangible Cultural Property – Sugiyama Shounikaiin, Yamatokōriyama, Nara, Japan
  • Year: 2013
Old Toys and the Future Seen Through Cats

Old Toys and the Future Seen Through Cats

  • Type: Drawing / Digital Printing
  • Medium: Ink on paper / Inkjet print
  • Solo Exhibition: Old Toys and the Future Seen Through Cats
  • Place: Sabo Kouenjishorin, Kōenji, Tokyo, Japan
  • Year: 2012
Unexpected Harmonious Things Often Happen

Unexpected Harmonious Things Often Happen

  • Type: Sumi-e (Ink Wash Painting) / Digital Printing
  • Medium: Gold leaf and paint, ink, and inkjet print on Japanese paper on styrofoam
  • Dimensions: 6⅓ x 6⅓" each
  • Group Exhibition: Wa–Art
  • Place: Onishi Gallery, New York, NY, USA / Ginza Art Hall, Chūō, Tokyo, Japan / 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
  • Year: 2011
Hanafuda (Flower Cards) Design Pattern

Hanafuda (Flower Cards) Design Pattern - October

  • Type: Sumi-e (Ink Wash Painting)
  • Medium: Gold leaf and paint, and ink on Japanese colored paper
  • Dimensions: 12 sheets 10⅝ x 9¾" each
  • Group Exhibition: 21 Spirits of Kanazawa
  • Place: NY Coo Gallery, New York, U.S.
  • Year: 2011
Prayer - Everlastingness of Mujô

Prayer - Everlastingness of Mujô

  • Type: Sumi-e (Ink Wash Painting) / Digital Printing
  • Medium: Ink on Japanese paper / Inkjet print
  • Group Exhibition: Prayer - Everlastingness of Mujô / HANARART
  • Place: Masaki House, Nara city, Nara, Japan
  • Year: 2011

These were works part of my group exhibition in a Japanese traditional wooden townhouse during an art festival in Nara, Japan, as a way of praying for the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011. Nara sumi (black ink), the oldest and largest production in Japan, was used with brushes, also a traditional craft of Nara, on Japanese paper. For other works, I used pieces of gold leaf. I took motifs from the treasures of the Shōsōin Repository, a Unesco World Heritage Site in Nara since I was inspired by the transnational and universal aspects of the rare items which had been preserved for about 1300 years. I contrasted the timeless connotation of the treasures to the Japanese philosophical concept of mujô, which means impermanence, transience, or a sense of the evanescence of life. Through this idea of a transient flowing time, I was seeing a conflict or gap between a spiritual state and the material reality. Connecting the past to the present, and Japan to the world, I regarded this creation as the basis of a hope to reconstruct Japan. It was my prayer for the repose of the soul so that the spirits continue to live everlastingly.