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Japanese Style Painting

ROOTS

Reinterpretation

The Spinning Wheel of Karma

The Spinning Wheel of Karma

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Herbs, charcoal, chalk, gesso, ink, and acrylic on canvas
  • Dimensions: 14 x 18"
  • Solo MFA Thesis Exhibition: MU - Mutation Ecologies
  • Place: MFA Gallery, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2019

This motif is a spool of thread that has been, for a long time and in many cultures, a symbol of a feminine tool and labor at home. This item has been used for representing yamamba (the mountain crone) in Japanese folklore and Noh play. The demon yamamba has variously been viewed as a symbol of motherhood, as a feminist figure, as an incarnation of nature and the cosmos, and as an embodiment of wisdom and human enlightenment. I depict its mutating spin as a wise female labor on recycled canvas with natural herbs.

Tōhaku's Pine Trees and Deformation

Tōhaku's Pine Trees and Deformation

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Ink, gesso, and acrylic on canvas
  • Dimensions: 20 x 10" / 24 x 8"
  • Solo MFA Thesis Exhibition: MU - Mutation Ecologies
  • Place: MFA Gallery, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2019

I show psychological mutation from the perspective of traditional Japanese theater, painting, literature, Buddhism, Shintoism, and aesthetics of nature, as an abstract figuration of purity and detachment from worldly desires, and because it was an important motif in classical Japanese painting. Reinterpreting the Pine Trees Screen (Shōrin-zu byōbu) by Japanese painter Hasegawa Tōhaku (1539-1610), I paint a contemporary image of a deformed pine tree. It embodies the continuous need for the purification of haunted human spirits and minds.

Mutating Moment #6 and #7

Mutating Moment #6 and #7

  • Type: Drawing
  • Medium: Charcoal and ink on kraft paper
  • Dimensions: 24 x 24" / 36⅝ x 27½"
  • Group Exhibition: Spoor
  • Place: Pilotenkueche, Leipzig, Germany
  • Year: 2018
Mutating Moment #5

Mutating Moment #5

  • Type: Mixed Media Painting
  • Medium: Charcoal, ink, acrylic, clay, waste paper, and kraft paper on panel
  • Dimensions: 15¾ x 31½"
  • Group Exhibition: Spoor
  • Place: Pilotenkueche, Leipzig, Germany
  • Year: 2018

Through the idea of rehabilitation, these artworks came from reusing the material from a performance titled "The Day After" (which was itself reprocessing materials from a previous exhibition). I exhibited them by referring to the idea of the "spoor" which was the title of the exhibition. Through my previous performances, I learned to conceive the body as sculpture and architecture. I drew and painted moments of mutation on damaged papers to emphasize the traces left from previous uses.

Ōkyo's Dogs

Ōkyo's Dogs

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Oil on canvas on panel
  • Dimensions: 24 x 20"
  • Event: Open Studio
  • Place: Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2017
Japanese Bosch

Japanese Bosch

  • Type: Drawing
  • Medium: Ink on paper
  • Dimensions: 18 x 24"
  • Event: Open Studio
  • Place: Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Year: 2017
Vain Regrets

Vain Regrets

  • Type: Painting
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 23⅞ x 17⅞"
  • Solo Exhibition: In the Interval of Memories
  • Event: HANARART
  • Place: Registered Tangible Cultural Property - Sugiyama Shounikaiin, Yamatokōriyama, Nara, Japan
  • Year: 2013
Old Toys and the Future Seen Through Cats

Old Toys and the Future Seen Through Cats

  • Type: Drawing / Digital Printing
  • Medium: Ink on paper / Inkjet print
  • Solo Exhibition: Old Toys and the Future Seen Through Cats
  • Place: Sabo Kouenjishorin, Kōenji, Tokyo, Japan
  • Year: 2012
Unexpected Harmonious Things Often Happen

Unexpected Harmonious Things Often Happen

  • Type: Sumi-e (Ink Wash Painting) / Digital Printing
  • Medium: Gold leaf and paint, ink, and inkjet print on Japanese paper on styrofoam
  • Dimensions: 6⅓ x 6⅓" each
  • Group Exhibition: Wa-Art
  • Place: Onishi Gallery, New York, NY, USA / Ginza Art Hall, Chūō, Tokyo, Japan / 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
  • Year: 2011
Hanafuda (Flower Cards) Design Pattern

Hanafuda (Flower Cards) Design Pattern - October

  • Type: Sumi-e (Ink Wash Painting)
  • Medium: Gold leaf and paint, and ink on Japanese colored paper
  • Dimensions: 12 sheets 10⅝ x 9¾" each
  • Group Exhibition: 21 Spirits of Kanazawa
  • Place: NY Coo Gallery, New York, U.S.
  • Year: 2011
Prayer - Everlastingness of Mujô

Prayer - Everlastingness of Mujô

  • Type: Sumi-e (Ink Wash Painting) / Digital Printing
  • Medium: Ink on Japanese paper / Inkjet print
  • Group Exhibition: Prayer - Everlastingness of Mujô / HANARART
  • Place: Masaki Seminar House (Registered Tangible Cultural Property), Nara city, Nara, Japan
  • Year: 2011

These were works part of my group exhibition in a Japanese traditional wooden townhouse during an art festival in Nara, Japan, as a way of praying for the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011. Nara sumi (black ink), the oldest and largest production in Japan, was used with brushes, also a traditional craft of Nara, on Japanese paper. For other works, I used pieces of gold leaf. I took motifs from the treasures of the Shōsōin Repository, a Unesco World Heritage Site in Nara since I was inspired by the transnational and universal aspects of the rare items which had been preserved for about 1300 years. I contrasted the timeless connotation of the treasures to the Japanese philosophical concept of mujô, which means impermanence, transience, or a sense of the evanescence of life. Through this idea of a transient flowing time, I was seeing a conflict or gap between a spiritual state and the material reality. Connecting the past to the present, and Japan to the world, I regarded this creation as the basis of a hope to reconstruct Japan. It was my prayer for the repose of the soul so that the spirits continue to live everlastingly.